Weight loss is all about making small lifestyle changes. We've rounded up the best science-backed tips to shed a couple pounds in the easiest, healthiest ways.

Diet Tips: 67 Science-Backed Ways to Lose Weight

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You might also like:  {{displayTitle}} Read More Healthy habits can quickly go out the window when we’ve got a tight deadline, no time for the gym, and few options but takeout food. Losing weight is no easy task, and doing it the healthy way can be even harder. We’re advocates for making small changes each day, rather than making drastic changes all at once. But it’s important to remember that just because a weight-loss strategy works for some (even if it’s backed by scientific studies) it may not work for everyone. From drinking more water to eating from blue plates, we’ve rounded up some of our favorite weight-loss tips to add to your daily routine.

Disclaimer: This article is not meant to be a comprehensive weight loss guide. Each entry may not be right for every individual. We at Greatist believe in providing readers with the information to make their own healthy choices based on a variety of weight loss techniques. What's appropriate for one person may not be best for his or her friend, mom, cousin, etc. As always, consult with a healthcare professional before starting any weight loss program.

Tips for Eating

1. Get the Blues

“I got the blues” may conjure up memories of those macaroni and cheese commercials from the ‘90s, but we’re talking about blue dishware. The color blue can act as an appetite suppressant because it has the least appealing contrast to most food. Research says to avoid plates that match the food served on them (like white plates and fettuccini Alfredo), because there is less of a contrast, which may prompt us to eat more. A small but potentially useful trick!

2. Eat Snacks!

Skipping out on snack time won’t necessarily lead to weight loss, since low calorie consumption can actually slow metabolism Hypothalamic lipophagy and energetic balance. Singh, R. Department of Medicine (Endocrinology) and Molecular Pharmacology, Member of the Diabetes Research Center, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY. Aging, 2011 October; 3(10): 934–942. . Eating less than three times a day may benefit those who are obese, but research shows skipping meals throughout the day and eating one large meal at night can lead to some undesirable outcomes (like delayed insulin response) which may increase the risk of diabetes Fast food consumption and breakfast skipping: predictors of weight gain from adolescence to adulthood in a nationally representative sample. Niemeier, H.M, Raynor, H.A., Lloyd-Richardson, E.E. et al. Weight Control and Diabetes Research Center, The Miriam-Hospital/Brown Medical School, Providence, Rhode Island. Journal of Adolescent Health, 2006 Dec;39(6):842-9. Impact of Reduced Meal Frequency

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